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mlmorrison

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 #1 
I don't know about the "rapid air movement" idea; not sure why that would be for bats. Flying in the daytime eliminates their great advantage of echolocation and also predator avoidance. Would also depend on time of year and what they are doing (that is, spring versus summer versus fall). 
XPBC

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 #2 
Usually we see Bats sipping water from the tubs around dusk till just after sunset. An older than me Desert Rat told me once that if you see Bats in the daytime you are in for rapid air movement the next day.  I know this is usually about 90% the case from experience. Is there any scientific observations to prove this phenomena? 
Just wondering.
 
mlmorrison

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 #3 
Most bats migrate (like birds) out of our area for winter--no bugs to eat! Those that stay go into regular torpor or actual long-term hibernation at higher elevations (above 6000' elevation). The ones we are studying pretty much hibernate from Nov to first of March. Like bears they wake up on occasion to adjust position and urinate and such. Critical not to disturb them in winter becuse waking up takes a lot of energy, and if they do that too often they cannot survive to spring (nothing to eat usually in winter of course).
atexfamilyfuncentre

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 #4 
interesting
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BigDaddyJEH

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 #5 
I was in Burro Schmitt Mine a few months ago and I did not see any bats or any signs of bats!  It is a fun hike through the mine and then round the mountain back to the shack.
John914

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 #6 
Very interesting stuff. Thanks for the info and keep it coming, please!
mlmorrison

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 #7 
Not sure about Burro Schmitt Mine--never been there that I know of. There are probably up to 10 species of bats in the Valley during spring to fall, from large ones like Mexican free-tails to the smallest in North American the canyon bat (they come out at dusk--so if you see a very small bat it is them). And there are multiple species of what we call Myotis--all look and call about the same (we can record their echolocation calls, analyze them on a computer, and get a good idea of the species).
Mr.T

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 #8 
Great picture, thanks for the info.  [smile]  I saw a couple bats that may have been that species in a mine near Echo Canyon, above the dry falls.
GAfromGA

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 #9 
Thanks for the very interesting information!
Salt Peter

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 #10 
Which bats do we see in the winter and/or cooler months?
fheiser

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 #11 
Do they live in Burro Schmitt's mine?
mlmorrison

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 #12 
No in summer they are active although they can go into a daytime torpor; happens especially in late summer into fall. Come November they start moving up slope and go into hibernation by late Nov into mid December. They come out first of March. So basically they don't eat for 3-4 months. Critical they are not disturbed in hibernation because waking up causes a great loss of fat reserves (and you cannot store much fat if you need to fly!).
Salt Peter

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 #13 
That is really interesting. Thank you for sharing. Do they hibernate during summer at those altitudes?
mlmorrison

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 #14 
At the recommendation of Salt Peter I am adding some comments on wildlife. I am a wildlife biologist who does a lot of research in the Inyo and White mountains (since late 1980s). Currently including the slopes of the Inyo's in Saline for a project on the Townsend's big-eared bat (see photo). They occur year round--breeding in colonies of 50-300 females at low elevations, and then migrating up elevation to hibernate usually above 7000 feet (and up to 11000). Mostly occur in caves and mines. We PIT tag them (a PIT tag is a "passive integrated transponder"--it is what folks call a "microchip" in pets) in summer and then look for their wintering sites. So basically we bake in the summer and freeze in the winter. I know of 4 maternity colonies in the Inyo's above Saline; all abandoned mines. Oh yeah, they specialize in eating moths. Cheers IMG_0520.JPG
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