Saline Preservation Association

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myenzie

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 #31 
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starryeyedwonder

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 #32 
oops!  road-tripper, I don't pass judgment, I have no expectations.  My intention was to convey that the bat road can change dramatically from one trip to the next - that's all.  When I commented "a bit marginal", I was referring to the ground clearance of the sedan and the tires on the trailer, which I think you said were from Harbor Freight. It sounds like you're on top of the situation.
road_tripper

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 #33 
Well, I'm sorry my camp rig doesn't meet your expectations... but you did ask "what rigs DO people bring in"

As far as which pass to take or whether the bat road is passable... well obviously I made it to the springs. When I was driving in on that trip, I passed a big SUV which was leaving the valley a bit east of the lippincott turnoff.  It was full of 'bros' who looked at my car and trailer and opined I would not make it.  They were driving out on a popped rear tire (mostly just rim at that point).  As I passed with a smile, I saw they had another popped tire on the back of their SUV.

I've driven that car 240,000 miles, and so I kind of know its limits (ground clearance, traction, etc).  The passes go from smooth as silk to horrible washboard.  I've only driven to the springs 4 times but the road has never needed high clearance (north or south pass) on the trips I've made.  Bat road, on the other hand, requires a bit of careful negotiation and line choosing when driving a low-clearance car like mine.  But it's still possible.  Sometimes I even need to stop, get out of the car, and move some big rocks off the road so my car can get through!  Ok, the rocks are pretty small but still big enough to cause me damage.  My car is all-wheel-drive which makes getting through the dicey parts possible.

On one of my trips out there I did see a big RV (older), and was marveling at the fact that it was there.  I think that if one drives slowly enough... pretty much anything can get out there.  I certainly wouldn't make the Saline Valley my destination for a first 'shakedown' camping trip, though 😉
starryeyedwonder

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 #34 
I don't know road_tripper, I admire your enthusiasm, but that rig looks a bit marginal for the conditions.  I don't think it would make it through the north pass.  The south pass is well graded and should be ok. But it's that last five miles along the bat road, which can have variable conditions.  I've seen it smooth as silk, I've seen it with patches of loose deep sand, surprisingly deep ruts, and a few whoopsie-do's.  Also, last time I was in the springs, I saw two flats, one with a nasty sidewall puncture.

I was hoping someone would weigh in and say, "We use trailer xyz, and we love it!", but, perhaps not.
road_tripper

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 #35 
I have driven a home-built trailer out to the springs.  My trailer base is the el cheapo 'horror fright' and the trailer tires were from the same place.  No problems driving in or out.  My tow rig is an audi a4; I have all-terrain tires on it (geolander at-s).


saline_1.jpg

starryeyedwonder

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 #36 
That captures the pros and cons nicely.  I'm thinking of a trailer of some sort, but wondering if they get shook to pieces over those washboards. I think a trailer would need a high lift kit and good tires, but is a trailer that's been to Saline watertight the next season? Or do all of the rivets loosen up and create leaks during the next rainstorm that the trailer sees? Same for a camper?
trigger

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 #37 
They bring in everything. Literally. Pros and cons to every option out there. Just depends on what your needs and wants are. We've done trailers, tents and sleeping in the rig. All were good and bad. One consistent though in my opinion is 4 wheel drive, good tires and a mild lift at least. Whether your sleeping in the vehicle or towing with it. If you want a trailer there are some nice offroad versions out there that come with offroad worthy tires. But there you go again, pros and cons. Trailer = expensive, separate registration, insurance, storage, slower drive cause your towing and less maneuverability. Sleeping in your rig as you know can be a pain if you bring a lot of gear like we do. Moving it back and forth sucks. But the security of it and protection from those high winds is nice at night when your sleeping. Tents = cheap, easy to set up (Coleman instant tents), free up your vehicle for exploration. Buuuuut not fun in the afterburner like winds of Saline, no insulation and you get to hear the burrows getting into every unsecured food storage bin at the springs. Cabovers = expensive, storage when not in use and limited exploration abilities. Even if you have the much over rated Earth Roamer you still can’t drive to some of the coolest things Death Valley has to offer. This is just our experience. Hope it helps you some :)
Coyote

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 #38 
I take my TRD Off-road Tacoma. The first time I visited it was bone stock and kept it in 4-hi the whole time. I came in the south pass and left through the north pass. I have since got better tires and traction pads but I haven't had to use the pads yet.
starryeyedwonder

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 #39 
After sleeping in the back of the Jeep the past few times I've been to the springs, I'm thinking that when I head out later this year, I'll upgrade a bit.  I've noticed all kinds of rigs parked about, but I never really paid attention to what they were.  What DO people bring in?  I'm guessing mostly cabovers on 4x4 pickup trucks, but I've also seen campers. What campers? Even saw a yellow school bus once.  Do people bring trailers?  
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