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Major Tom

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 #1 
I think this whole issue of "Full compliance with water quality and public health standards ... " as specified in most of the Alternatives for the Recreational Water Usage element is the biggest can of worms we face.
Hard Rock John

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 #2 
Morning Tom,
First, it was great seeing you guys a couple weeks ago. After saying good by to Ron and Jodine, I decided to work my way back to Keeler. BTW, I worked in water quality for many years. I still hold some certifications. I have some good connections in the EPA and a few other Federal agencies. There are some Point of Use EPA authorized programs and some State programs like the one used in Keeler. There are some hoops to jump through and some cost involved along with the uncertainties involved with it being Federal land. So, if there is something I can help with, please let me know. 
   Namaste
Jukebox Mark

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 #3 
Thanks Tom. While I am not sure how users and/or user groups may help in this regard, it does give us some useful information in making comments. I should have something for you soon.[wink]
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Major Tom

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 #4 
I inquired about current and ongoing water testing protocols, and received the following reply:

Hi Tom,

 

I'm sorry that the contact at the County was not helpful.  Take a look at the link below for the application of Titles 17 and 22 California Code of Regulations Related to Drinking Water.

 

The coliform sampling that I conducted at the springs in December was the same as the routine monthly sampling that we are required to take at our potable sources.  However, there was no intention at this time to start routine sampling at Saline Valley, and they have not been sampled since.  So these analyses are just a "snapshot" of the coliform content at this time.  The samples were taken directly from the three source pools.  First the chlorine content was measured with a portable test kit and recorded on the sample bottles.  The bottles are provided by the Inyo County Environmental Health (ICEH) lab--they they come sealed, and they contain a powder that deactivates residual chlorine content.  As expected, there was no detectable chlorine content in the source pools, and was therefore recorded as zero.  The bottles were dipped into the source pools and carefully filled to the "fill to" line.  Latex gloves were worn during sampling, and a new pair was worn at each site.  The bottles were put on ice in a cooler, and transported directly to the ICEH lab in Independence.  The results are attached.

 

Key:  

SVW = Wizard Source = sample # 1312 045

SVV = Volcano Source = sample # 1312 046

SVL = Lower Source = sample # 1312 047

 

   

Applications of Title 17 and 22 California Code of Regulations Related to Drinking Water

 

Major Tom

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 #5 
I received this letter from the Park hydrologist. The Inyo County has recused themselves from any jurisdiction over the waters on what is now federal land. I hope this helps; I am not sure how to exactly answer your question. I will ask the Park Service in a series of questions I mean to address tomorrow.

Hi Tom,

Questions on water potability are best answered by the appropriate regulatory agency.  The park's water operators recommended that you direct questions to Mark Long at the Inyo County Dept. of Public Health (760) 878-0361.  I am not an expert on potability, but the following are some of the main reasons that Saline Valley Warm Springs are non-potable.

First and foremost--potable water sources need to be licensed by the State of California.  The following are some of the requirements for licensing:

Water from open (surface) sources must be filtered.

Potable water must be chlorinated, and chlorination must be carried out by licensed water operators.  Chlorine concentration must also be tested daily by licensed water operators.

Even with chlorination, monthly samples must be taken monthly for microbial (coliform) analyses.

A suite of analyses (known as Title 22) must be done on each spring source prior to licensing (annually afterwards).  These analyses cost nearly $3000 each, but this would be a waste of money without first having a viable plan for chlorination.

I hope that this helps

Richard

Jukebox Mark

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 #6 
I am over half way through my comment letter [currently at ten pages!]and have reached the water sampling element. For those of us like myself that are unaware of the current water sampling protocols, could someone more 'in the know' post up what they know about the process. TIA

Jukebox

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