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Rusty Scout

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Posts: 37
 #1 
They can't be that bad because I heard that some of the Toyota TRD Pro trucks came with them.
paul belanger

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Posts: 270
 #2 
Well, hell.  At that price you can't go wrong. 


Best of travels.
Rusty Scout

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 #3 
Made a flash decision on tires at the alignment shop after a complete front end rebuild on the 1999 K1500 Suburban. After chipping away at the front end job on the asphalt under the redwoods for 3 weeks I went in for the alignment and dude had 4 brand new Load D LT265/75/16 Nitto Terra Grapplers AT tires some customer ended up not wanting. Asked about them and he says they could be mine for $700 mounted with a 50,000k manufacturers warranty. Done. Now I am about to go see how much of a fail this turns out to be around new years.
paul belanger

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 #4 
I recently bought some Cooper Discoverer AT3 315-75R16 for a rig I am building (35" tires).  They were $250 per, mounted and out the door.  I haven't had a change to use the rig yet, but these tires came well recommended and the price was beyond correct.
dstock

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Posts: 5
 #5 
I'm on my second set of the 285/70-17 E-rated Duratracs on my 4-door Jeep Wrangler, roughly 80,000k miles between the 2 sets and have had zero issues.  Have made several Death Valley trips, I usually air down to about 20psi off road.  Also run them on my off-road trailer.  Great all around tire.
florida

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Posts: 294
 #6 
My toyo e rated tires are carrying a lot of weight on top of a one ton dodge flatbed. I aired down only to 55. Highway they are at 80. 30,000 miles so far and they are wearing ok.
trigger

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Posts: 217
 #7 
People often make the mistake of running their tire pressures to high. How much pressure is determined by your rigs weight loaded and the weight rating of your tires. For example, if my rig weighs 5000lbs loaded with all my stuff and my E rated Toyo muds are rated at around 3600lbs carrying capacity each that means 3600X4=14,400lbs of weight carrying capacity. Divide that in half if you air down to 32.5PSI. That still puts me at 7200 lbs of weight carring capacity. So I can actually go even lower if I want. Much nicer ride on and off the road. We run our Toyos at 12 psi offroad and its a smooth ride. 30 PSI on the street. I used to run my 35" BFG muds at 5 PSI rock crawling with my Wrangler and it worked great....even with no bead locks. My people almost all run Toyo muds. From light weight rigs to heavy 3/4 and 1 tons. In my experience there's no better tire but there are other good brands out there.
XPBC

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Posts: 204
 #8 
We missed you Rusty for Halloween this year. I know you mentioned tires being an issue. I just did the third trip to Saline in the Dodge. "Two with Lance overhead camper" on Goodyear Wrangler All Terrain Adventure with Kevlar. That's without airing down while hauling the camper.
Vito just went to this same E rated tire on his Sportmobile after three BFG's KO2 exploded on the highway!  I saw the damage to the truck and AMP Research folding bars. Not only would BFG not honor any warranty for the tires the Van is jacked and also not covered. I really think the Goodyear ATA is good. I run 80psi rear and 60psi front while hauling the camper and go kinda slow. No camper down to 25psi and 1-1/2 hour South Pass.  
TRAUMAhead

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Posts: 19
 #9 
No problems with the 32" BFG KMs that originally came on my Jeep.  Been through Steel, North, South, Lippincott, Mengel, etc., never got a flat.  Got 45k miles, could've gotten more if I rotated regularly.  I'm currently on 37" Nitto Trail Grapplers, got 65k miles out of my last set in 35s, rotated every 3k.  Less off road trips on the Trail Grapplers but same roads.

In the Jeep crowd Nitto Trail Grapplers/Toyo MTs (Same company makes both tires) seem like the most bullet proof.  Read too many case of people tearing sidewalls on Duratracs, KM2s, and Goodyear MTR Kevlars, haven't read anyone doing that to a Nitto/Toyo.  The only problem with the Nittos and Toyos is weight.  They're around 10-20lbs heavier then other tires in the same size.

After going from an E rated tire to a D rated, I don't think I'll ever run an E again on my Jeep, it's too light and makes the ride stiff.  And 65 psi sounds crazy, I run my Nittos at 27 psi on the street.
tbone ribeye

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Posts: 17
 #10 
Four words.  Dick Cepek.  Baja proven.
Rusty Scout

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Posts: 37
 #11 
M55 sounds like a great desert tire and if I had a high dollar 3/4 ton rig and the extra money I would get them but my budget has really got to stay below $200 each on this project.

I have more time to ponder tires now. Was at the front end shop today trying to get an alignment after some shade tree work on the whooped idler arm and Pitman arm. Replaced them with Moog problem solver Idler arm and bracket and Pitman.....Found out the original ball joints, motor and tranny mounts are whooped also. That's about a week of after work wrenching. While I am at it I'll do poly control arm bushings and fresh tie rods especially after Giffs tie rod incident coming down the north pass earlier this year.

Love to hear about other Saline gearhead's tire endorsements or horror stories. Only other tire I have really desert tested has been a set of Goodrich mud terrain km2 load c 31 x 10.5 x 15 I bought in 1998 for the 1979 International SCout. That was another multiple desert missions flawless flatless never had to chain up 50,000 mile run. They are still on that beloved truck which needs some resurrection before I would trust it on another Saline mission.  Last run that truck ever did was  Salt Tram Swansea in 2014.
bobhuckaby

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Posts: 171
 #12 
I like the way they look and feel but not sure what to say for my Toyo M55 tires taller 255/85R16 on Dodge 2500 truck since we haven't had much snow since I got them, had a rock puncture thru tread while still new < 5k miles, but feel good on highway at 65 psi, and feel good when aired down to 24 psi going into Saline and still ok on highway until air up at Big Pine.  E sidewalls showing nicks but no cuts with 12 trips in/out. expensive $325 each at Les Schwab (but they made good on the puncture)
Bob from Tahoe
Rusty Scout

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Posts: 37
 #13 
Looking for desert rat tire advice from this community.

I need to make a decision on tires for my Saline rig in the next few days. The 1999 Suburban K1500 has been running the E rated Goodyear DuraTracs in the stock size for the last 5yrs and 50,000 miles and I might get another 10,000 out of them if I stick to only summer driving conditions on pavement. That's about 20-30 missions to the deserts of Saline, Moab, Baja and Black Rock with lots of highway pavement before the off pavement, some winter driving  and also a lot of daily driving around the sf bay area. Never had a flat, never had to chain up and only complaint was possible tire vibrations over 70mph *  Handled north pass fine in middle of the night on 8-12" of packed snow a few times no problem. There have been several snowy icy drives down the 395 or over I80 Donner where everyone else is losing traction and spinning out without chains where the Duratracs powered right on through without a hiccup.

Duratracs are mountain snowflake, studable, have rim protection and never let me down    Price about $200

Goodrich All Terrain KO2 (new version) are now mountain snowflake rated as well and they claim to have 20% stronger sidewalls than before.    Price about $180.  




Based on Tireack.com's slightly higher all around ratings on the Goodrich KO2, price and sidewall damage fear I am leaning towards them rather than my so far trusty Duratracs.






*   (tire shop insisted on having them inflated to 32psi for first part of their life and checked balance numerous times claiming they were in spec. Second tire shop specializing in used truck tires said    Ochenta!     80psi and do not go below 60psi on the highway...advice that I thought alleviated about 80% of vibration... Then I read about a  common condition plaguing OBS 1/2ton chevy suburbans: Beam Walk...which feels kinda like tire balance but really is the frame resonating at interstate speeds)
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