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rickandurs

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Posts: 78
 #1 
On the subject of tires, anyone going Hwy. 50 to 88 via South Lake Tahoe to 395 on way to Saline. I have two tires I would like to get to Lee, e-mail me at: (I live very close to 50 & 88)
rangerrick @ salinepreservation.org
 
simonlang2001

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 #2 
foot pumps work real well but you do need to exercise. 
JoltinJim

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 #3 
hey Dennis,
just depends if you want to crawl around the rocks or race over them   even at steel pass? no need to air down. if you want to competition rock crawl? sure sure air down, get bead lockers etc and go reeeeeal slow. but last time i checked there werent any rock crawling competitions in saline........ maybe major Tom will host one who knows
 as for the ride at full 50 psi? thats why i have the Bilsteins

i would have traded all those compressors for one good cutting torch  prez day weekend.

bottom line? air up down and all around if you want to. bring a compressor or dont. when a honda civic can make it in to saline on dry road going slow enough? who cares about the tire pressure lol

Timmy with a tundra had two flats going out steel pass and he made it with a good spare and 2 cans of slime/tire sealant. lots of good options for non compressor vehicles..........

Dennis if you are ever passing through bakersfield and want to do some wing shooting? ive got a buddy with a dairy who always needs pigeons thinned out. they taste pretty good wrapped in bacon

best wishes in your saline visits @ 25-50 psi & 10mph or 50+   JJ

SunMan

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 #4 
You definitely don't HAVE to air down, but it sure makes it easier on me and my rig, far less vibration.

Morrie, I run 265/75/16's at 35 PSI on my Tundra and air them down to 25PSI, the MV-50 takes about 15 minutes to air them back up. It does get hot but i have never had to let it cool down to air all four, even in triple digits. Now two vehicles? That might be a bit much. Might wanna invest in somehting a little more heavy duty then.
XPBC

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 #5 
Hey Joltin,
Though Baja racers don't air down, rock crawlers always do.  Rock crawlers air down for traction, I air down for comfort. 
I carry a small compressor only for backup.  My primary source for air is a ten pound CO2 tank bought at a local welding shop.  Tank, fixed regulator, ten feet of oxygen hose with air chuck cost about $120.  Trade in the tank for refill cost $18.00.  I can air back up from 18# to 35# all four tires in about eight minutes or less.  One tank will do this four times.  I believe aired down tires flex around sharps where 50# will puncture them.
Morrie

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Posts: 31
 #6 
Funny, even the manufacturer talks about airing them down.  Here's a quote from the BF Goodrich web page on their All-Terrain T/A KO tires:
Maximum all-terrain traction.
ShoulderLock™ technology with 40% wider shoulder grooves increases traction and control in aired-down driving.
Obviously they were engineered for this purpose.

I've done nearly all the backroads in DV with full pressure (back before I had decent tires that could be deflated) and lived to tell about it, but that doesn't mean I was happy.  There is no doubt in my mind that washboard surface are easier on the passengers and suspension with less pressure in the tires, no matter how slow you go, and it's pretty clear that there is a lot more rubber gripping the surface with lower pressure.
JoltinJim

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 #7 
guys guys guys ask yourself this............do the off road racers air down their tires?
 no they do not.  why? because the tires were meant to run at full pressure and maintain their structural integrity better aired up. for any of you saying steele pass needs aired down tires? that is a fallacy as well.  the times ive been through steele we never aired down our tires and didnt have any problems at all in stock toyota 4x4s and this year in a tundra with larger tires.

even going through the snow in the donner party Shannon's tundra did just fine not letting any air out of her tires.........we did however have chains on all 4's

so air down if you want to and waste the time of airing back up.........i prefer to use my time doing more constructive things or relaxing at the springs..........

toyotas, bilsteins and bfg's @ 50 psi................Ivan cant be wrong

Morrie

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Posts: 31
 #8 
45 minutes to air up 4 tires from 20 to 33 is not too bad.  In hot weather, does the MV-50 require periodic rests, or can it go continuously for that long?  I have a Wrangler with 33" tires.  Trouble is, I didn't mention that we travel with 2 vehicles and the other is a Rubicon Unlimited with bigger tires, I think 35", so doing both vehicles, even with a better compressor, would probably take 2 hours.  (I know, I should probably have a compressor per vehicle.)

It's hard to notice much ill effects from 20 psi except handling on sharp turns, which doesn't happen much on the way to the gas station.  I suppose that, even though they may not get noticeably hot, the tires are wearing much more at that pressure.

Dusty

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 #9 
@ 18-20 psi my Air compressor takes me to highway pressure 35 psi in about 45 minutes I got Lazy or forgot once and drove all the way home 177 miles on pavement on my BFG M/T's @ 20 Psi and drove around town before I noticed no ill effects except for bad gas millage and poor corning ... 
SunMan

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Posts: 44
 #10 

I don't think i'd air down to 12psi, that's almost soft sand pressure. However you didn't mention what type of vehicle you are driving. Also as you mentioned you don't wanna pinch your tire on a sharp dip and pop the bead.  Recommend getting a cheap compressor that connects directly to your battery, you can get one on the cheap at pep boys or other locations. Google the mv-50, money well spent (~$50). I'd be scared to drive 50 miles on pavement with pressure that low.

Morrie

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Posts: 31
 #11 
A question for those who air down their tires off the highway: do you bring along a compressor to fill them up again when you get back to the highway, or do you just drive aired-down to the next gas station?

I have a compressor, as good a one as I could get powered off the cigarette lighter, but it would take literally hours to pump my tires back up, so I never use it. I consider the compressor just an emergency item.  Instead, when I get back to the highway, I drive slowly with reduced pressure to the next fill-up opportunity, even if it's hours away.  Because I need to drive the highway, and I worry about overheating the deflated tires, I don't air down below 20 psi, although I'm told 12 would be better for off road.  I have BFG AT's, and even driving 50 mph at 20 psi for an hour, the tires don't feel particularly warm, so maybe I'd be OK driving faster or going to a lower pressure.

Am I being overly conservative and could I go down to 12 psi even if I need to drive it on the highway later?  I also worry about the tires popping off the rims with too little air -- not sure at what point that would be a concern.
JoltinJim

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Posts: 53
 #12 
during the presidents day weekend i took a look at a number of trucks.........most had BFG all terrains on them.......for a good reason..........my 86 toyota is on its 8th set of bfg's and its unlikely it will ever wear any other brand.  bring "crap" tires into saline and you are asking for trouble.
rickandurs

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Posts: 78
 #13 
Dave/Suzie
What a revolutionary idea, an inner tube, gee, wist I would have though of that.
I have encountered folks with donuts on their rentals, not.
redondo dave

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Posts: 18
 #14 

I suppose you could get a tube to put in it if the hole isn't to big.


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David & Suzi
appletreasures

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Posts: 25
 #15 

I’d like this thread to be a discussion of the importance tires, their care, and repair. Please share your secrets and stories.

 

One of the important concerns when driving to Saline Valley is tires.

ALWAYS HAVE A “GOOD SPARE”.

 

I don’t have the best tires so I compensate by bringing along several spares. I usually have two tires on rims and at least one loose tire. My loose spares don’t usually have lots of tread but are more than fine to use as an emergency spare.

 

In the total time I have been going to the Hot Springs I have only had one flat tire. That tire was in good condition and fairly new. It could not be repaired because a sharp rock caused side wall damage. Lee mounted one of my loose spares and life was good.

 

If I make it to the springs, I try to leave at least one loose spare with Lee. I do this so Lee will have tires for folks who need them to get home. Please check with Lee before dumping tires on him.

 

Recently while home I had a tire go flat because there was a small crack in sidewall leaking air. Obviously that tire can never be used for high speed highway driving. I’m trying to find a way to stop the leak so it can be used as one of my emergency spares for the Saline Valley Road drive.

 

Can anyone advise me how to stop this leak?

I’ve thought of slime but I am told that it is corrosive.

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