Saline Valley Talk

Hosted by SPA, the Saline Preservation Association

Let's talk!

Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
Glidergeek

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 19
 #1 
I have 4 WD
paul belanger

Registered:
Posts: 248
 #2 
and now that ya got'em....ya ain't gonna need 'em...
paul belanger

Registered:
Posts: 248
 #3 
"A winch being firmly mounted giving a good tug in a sticky situation" is a discussion thread of it's own. One I myself might take an interest in. Though likely not apropos for this board.
James Sel

Registered:
Posts: 335
 #4 
I don't believe in snow it's a myth
trigger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 181
 #5 
LOL!
SilverBob

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 385
 #6 
But you said you just ordered some.  That's good, because the first step is admitting you have a problem.  [thumb]
SilverBob

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 385
 #7 
Good point, Trigger.  The first time you put your chains on should be at home in your driveway!  That way you know how they work and how tight they need to be.  It's also best to cut off any extra links, as that eliminates some of the confusion.  You should always install your chains BEFORE you need them!  Don't wait till you're stuck in a drift and have to shovel the snow away from the tires to even get the chains on.  It's always easier to do these things on your terms, rather than on Nature's terms.

Once you've done it a few times, you should be able to chain up all 4 tires on a "normal" truck or SUV in 20-30 minutes or less.  Obviously, if your truck has duals or really oversize tires, it might take a little longer.

Winches (the electric kind) can be very useful, although most people don't know how to use them correctly.  If you travel alone, a winch on the front will just pull you deeper into the snow drift.  If you have one mounted on a receiver-type mount, you can stick it on the back and actually pull yourself OUT!  That's usually the preferred result.

Good discussion here, but I still haven't heard anyone explain why they don't carry chains.  I know you're out there, let's hear from you. 
trigger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 181
 #8 
I like watching people try to get their chains on for the first time while they're in the snow. That's fun! I think people hate the idea of putting the things on. I think they would rather just wing it and take the chance. Personally I love em! Saved my butt a few time. I've got big ones for all 4 tires and they Definately dig. For anybody thinkin about buying snow chains for Saline consider heavy duty large link chains if you got the clearance for em. I've clawed my way up steep hills through the Panamints like it was nothing. Still manage to break links tho. Cant say too much about my winch. She reads the forum too. That said shes very firmly mounted and great to have around when I need a good tug in a sticky situation.
Sam D.

Registered:
Posts: 728
 #9 
May I add a small rug one can put under a tire? Saved me few times in deep sand and ice.
bobhuckaby

Registered:
Posts: 135
 #10 
just need to find a winch that will put up with the washboard, oh, makes me think about the winch doing the laundry too
PahrumpGeorge

Registered:
Posts: 53
 #11 
A shovel is very important.
A good winch is also important; she can do the shoveling.
A really good winch can put the chains on for you.

James Sel

Registered:
Posts: 335
 #12 
Chains or no chains, snow or no snow carry a good shovel. ...winch or no winch


anyways,
Snow is nature's antidote to washboard
oski6754

Registered:
Posts: 8
 #13 
I was the one who reported the 10-12" of snow and the jeep club getting turned back.  I didn't see either the jeep club or the 10-12" of snow, but was passing along the best and most consistent information that was coming into the valley on Sunday and Monday.  Jeepers never made it to the springs.  Camped in the South end of the valley and then headed out.  I guess standing by the toilet and talking wasn't enough of a draw to traverse the valley!
 
That being said, a Ford Explorer towing a pop-up camper (which I did see) either couldn't make it out or chickened out when trying to leave via the North on Sunday and turned around to go South.  Doesn't make the Jeeps or foot of snow more true, but I think it takes 1-2" out of the equation.

We were traveling in a friend's vehicle, but if we'd had mine we would have given the North pass a shot . . . because I carry chains!  See you all soon.

nps dv.PNG 
paul belanger

Registered:
Posts: 248
 #14 
Like James says, storms don't just come outta nowhere. IMHO, though, taking the Saline journey in the winter, you should have them anyway, whether you use it or not, saw blade cutter.
James Sel

Registered:
Posts: 335
 #15 
I've never seen a snow storm just show up out of nowhere. Current weather patterns can be observed prior to the trip and if a high pressure system is building up off the coast it'll be precipitation free for at least a few days.  When a storm is headed this way it may or may not be a snow event when it arrives and its history can help indicate its future behaviors. Such as is a big storm event with northern cold air or tropic warmer air and predicted snow levels all apply. (this is just a simple generalization of forecasting there is more to it).

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

Chat Room

Appreciate the forum? Value SPA's efforts? Donations to the Saline Preservation Association are tax deductible!