Saline Preservation Association

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SilverBob

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 #1 
Yeah, they might harm the endangered California Mountain Snowflake.   
Tule

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 #2 
Gee I don't know...they seem to not be eco-friendly.
Rusty Scout

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 #3 
thanks for the thoughts!
trigger

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 #4 
Those are Awsome!!!! I want em!!!
SilverBob

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 #5 
Better yet, screw the chains!  Get yourself a set of these... 
trigger

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 #6 
The Vbars are extremely aggressive! You won't go wrong with them in the dirt offroading but god help you if you hit hard pack dirt or clear pavement for any length of time. Lol! It's a seriously bumpy ride! I bought 2 sets of the heavys (same thing just without the Vbar) and offroaded them hard in rocks and snow and they were great. Held up and got me up steep hill climbs. If you might use chains on pavement once in awhile you might wanna trade for a heavy duty set without the Vbar but if you think you'll only use them offroad in places like saline then the Vbar can't be beat!! Besides, I've always thought overkill is a beautiful thing!!!
SilverBob

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 #7 
Yeah, those heavy ones are kind of a pain.  It's best to try them out at home and cut them to length before you need them.  I just lay them out on the ground, make sure they're not twisted or anything.  If you have the cam-lock type, the cam-locks go on the outside.  Drive the tire onto the chains about 1/4 the length of the chain.  Now when you lay the long side over the tire, gravity will hold it there  at the 9:00 position on the tire while you use both hands to lift the short end up to hook it.  If you don't have cam-locks, make sure you use rubber tensioning bands to hold it on.

From what I'm hearing, you probably won't need chains going in.  I don't know how long you're staying, but there are a couple more fronts that are supposedly coming through in the next week.  Take lots of supplies and be prepared!
Rusty Scout

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 #8 
I hate to say it but I have close to zero experience putting on the heavy chains. Are there any helpful hints on throwing them on good and quick without much struggle? I am assuming a good supply of heavy electrical ties and baling wire are important for malfunctions.

Funny thing is these heavy v-bar chains have been out to Saline a bunch of times but the snow and ice were never an issue with the bfg mud terrains on the scout. I am going to make the run this Friday.
SilverBob

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 #9 
I have the heavy V-bar chains for my Bronco.  They were always up to the task of pushing through snow over the hood on the North Pass.  Since I don't do that anymore, (I'd rather go through Steel Pass) I now cary the lighter chains in my Jeep.  I've only used them once, but they did the job quite well.  Just try not to spin your wheels in the snow, and take them off as soon as you get onto dirt, and they'll probably hold up fine.
Spider

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 #10 
We usually carry those super heavy "real" chains (no idea what the proper name for them is), and they have helped us twice to tow other people out of the snow. So if for nothing else - they'll get cars that are trying to get out of the valley out of your way when you are on the way in

Rusty Scout

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 #11 
My current Saline rig is a 1999 k1500 suburban with GoodYear Dura-Trac lt245/75/16 (these aggressive all terrains load e tires have the rare canuk "Mountain/Snowflake' rating and have stud capability)

A while back I bought some Heavy Duty V-Bar chains but man those suckers are HEAVY. About 60 lbs a pair and I got 2 pairs. These chains seem like the real deal if you are going to battle the ice on the north pass. Is it overkill? Did I really need to spend close to $200 bucks on fat heavy off road logging truck chains that are probably illegal on California highways?

I recently added another set of chains to my winter kit. $69 a set Chinamart Peerless Auto-Trac auto tightening chains just to have in case I encounter a CHP road block that requires chains no matter what. My take on these chains is that they may barely do the trick at slow speeds on the freeways with mild ice conditions. Chain size is extra wimpy.  each set weighs in at less than 10 lbs but they come in a nifty easy to handle small flat plastic box.  S clearance specs too. while these are convenient to carry around I could not see how these would improve traction on the nasty bits of North Pass.

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