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gael

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 #16 
Expect consistent highs of 110 - 125 and consistent lows of 90 - 100.
Towards late afternoon, the south wind will make it feel 15 degrees hotter.
Saline Valley in the summer is essentially a giant convection oven.
Assuming you know what to bring, how to set up a proper camp under these conditions, and really really enjoy heat, it could be quite nice.
You might even have the whole place to yourself, like camping on mars.
pugsly

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 #17 
We left Memorial Day weekend (on the Saturday), there were definitely some folks showing up there to party and I was glad we were moving on.  We had planned on staying a little longer but it was getting hotter every day, and having a bunch of drunk people loudly sharing their music right next to us was the icing on the cake.
BigDaddyJEH

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 #18 
Anybody been in the last couple of weeks.  I am thinking about going at the end of July, but I think it may be just to HOT!
BigDaddyJEH

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 #19 
I was there over Memorial Day weekend.  There were a lot of people there, that were not regulars and the loud music was annoying.  Nevertheless, the weather was great and we had a great time!  I cannot wait to get back, but it is getting HOT.

BTW, Swansea / Cerro Gordo trails are FUN!
Tomonoar

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 #20 
Reminds me of my first desert camping experience in 1974. I enrolled in the Merrit Jr. College Desert Studies program. Part of the class involved visiting what is now the East Mojave National Preserve over the spring break. The second or third day there a wind storm blew in out of the SE, straight line winds of 45-50mph and gusts over 60mph. Standard stuff for the desert. We were out on a guided hike on top of Wild Horse Mesa when the storm started. By the time we got back, there were only two tents left standing: my tiny SkiHut A-frame mountaineering tent and a Sierra Designs four person center pole tent. Everything else was either in shreds or blown across the desert and stuck to the ubiquitous cholla cactus. The campers who used tube tents did well if they collapsed their tent and placed rocks on the arraignment when ever they weren't occupying it.
gael

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 #21 
The first time I camped at Saline I set up a $14.99 Sears tent with fiberglass poles and fat plastic tent stakes about 6 inches long. This worked fine for the first couple of days when the wind factor was zilch. But when Mother Nature opened up on the throttle I spent the next night with the nylon siding pressed down to my face and flapping incessantly, the tent stakes whipping and smashing about, the nylon poles cracked and useless ... and getting little sleep. What a dummy.

Basic comfort in the (always unpredictable and often brutal) desert unfortunately requires the most expensive (low to mid profile rip-stop nylon canopy, engineered aluminum poles) tent you can afford. I've also found that 24" rebar stakes hammered deep into the soil, and thin, high strength nylon cording will do the trick. The rebar can also hold down the corners of the tent nicely. Tennis balls should be placed over the rebar tops as to prevent late night drunken impalements. In fact I've never lost a tent or camp-mate using this method.

As for the temperature, I recommend the appropriate size military grade camo netting to provide shade and to break down the wind. It is important to use military grade netting as opposed to the crap they sell at Cabella's, etc. The imitation netting shreds very quickly, in fact it's utterly worthless. The netting can be suspended above the tent/campsite by 1.5 inch diameter (unbreakable) pvc poles of 5-6 feet in length. A Tarp will tend to catch the wind like a sail and flap, flap, flap ... until insanity begins to set in. Netting lets the wind flow through and is therefore very quiet, and also much cooler. Tarps tend to trap and amplify heat underneath. Another benefit to camo netting is you can impregnate it with the appropriate bug juice. No-see-ums tend not to enter enclosed spaces. And so on and so forth ...

Obviously, most hardcore Saliners have their own situations worked out nicely and I'm not offering anything particularly new or useful to them. So I guess this post is for the greenhorns, the youngins, the hipster-come-latelies, the generally challenged, and of course, our German friends, God bless them, one and all. And welcome.


timothy_sutherland

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 #22 
That sucks. People come to get away from that kind of stuff. I hate it when others play any kind of music out loud, it's disrespectful to others. Put on headphones!
pugsly

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 #23 
We rolled into Saline on Tuesday and left on Saturday.  When we got there it was nice and by the time we left it had become really hot again. Also a bunch of party hard types set up at dragon pool right next to where we were camped and loudly shared their music choices with the entire lower springs which hastened our departure.

Lee and Kay were fine, made a contribution to their "camp host beer fund".
P3Tacco

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 #24 
Sam D., agreed.  We were there through that also and my tent survived, but it sure wasn't fun, especially Saturday night, wow!  I always put boulders inside the corners of the tent and ropes out to boulders from the corner poles. Sorry, I got off topic...
James Sel

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 #25 
Temps will peak from 95-96 degrees this weekend
Sam D.

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 #26 
Yep, it's better to triangulate between Bishop, Olancha and Furnace Creek.

Temperature wise, it blew big time on Friday, 87F on Saturday daytime with the major storm and rain at night. Sunday was nice. The wind was mild and daytime temps were in the upper 80's. It rained Tuesday morning with snow at higher elevations.

A word of advice - if you sleep in a tent invest in heavy duty stakes. The storm forced many campers leave early with numerous reports of broken tents.
DVExile

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 #27 
Be aware that the NWS point forecast for Saline Valley is usually grossly in error by as much as 10 to 15F.  I'm not sure exactly what they've got screwed up in their model but it often gives ridiculous temperatures such as the same or even cooler than Lone Pine (which is 2500 ft higher or about 10F cooler just based on lapse rate).

Rather than using a point forecast on the springs I find a better guess is to average the forecast temperature for Lone Pine and Stovepipe Wells.  That does a half way decent job of dealing with the elevation differences as well as the generally increasing temperatures to the east for equal altitudes.

Anyway, it is supposed to be unseasonably cool all around the area this weekend.  Based on forecasts for other areas I'd expect it to be around 89-91F at the springs this weekend which is quite pleasant for this time of year.
BigDaddyJEH

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 #28 
Thanks for the feedback!  I really appreciate it!  
ski3pin

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 #29 
National Weather Service Point Forecast
Terawanderer

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 #30 
I see 80 to 81 degrees sat and sun.....Should be pretty nice.....compared tp 100 plus.
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