Saline Preservation Association

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Salt Peter

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 #1 
All good points here.
I do disagree with driving slowly and getting flats. I've had two flats driving in the area. One at a speed greater than 35mph and one in the 5mph range. Flats happen. To date I've had good results using load range E tires with teflon reinforced sidewalls.
Romy

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 #2 
Five minutes is overly generous given the rear vehicle will be breathing dust.  I'll give about a minute on dirt.  Then, depending on my schedule, I'll either slow down/pull off for a break or to explore and let a gap form, or I'll get over to the other side of the road and turn my lights/flash brights on so I can be seen in mirrors if the front driver is even mildly paying attention.  I expect people to pull over in this situation, much like on a paved road, it is the courteous/expected way to drive on rural roads.  I'll then pass by slowly to not dust them out.

While I realize that most people that travel to SV/DV don't drive dirt normally, that does not give an excuse to drive like a jerk (for either party).  Albeit if party A is being a dick, there should be no surprise if party B dicks back.

Tires suited to the road go a long way to not getting flats.  A/Ts or M/Ts with the appropriate load rating (or higher) and you should be fine.
Sparky of SoCal

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 #3 

For those poken down the road at whatever pace you personally fill comfortable with in whatever equipped vehicle you may be in that you do not own the road. No more than somebody wishing to proceed at a faster pace in a vehicle much more suited for the type of road travelling. I myself will give you 5 minutes to check your mirror and do something right before I go by. I think 5 minutes on a two lane road is acceptable time.

SilverBob

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 #4 
Remember the wisdom of those who came before us. Turtle Jim always pointed out that nobody ever got a flat tire by driving too slowly.
peneumbra

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 #5 
What does Farabee charge for renting their jeeps? And if one gets damaged - say, hit by a meteor at the Springs, or something like that - will they pay Miller's to recover it?
mdskier

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 #6 
No choice, I lived in MD till 5 years ago and had to fly west and get a rental car.

One time I did rent a Jeep Cherokee for peace of mind ! 2x as much.
A Farabee jeep would be 4x as much.
peneumbra

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 #7 
If you had some ready-mix (and some water and a wheelbarrow), you could fill the tire with concrete...

I've never had tire problems going to or coming back from the Springs (0ver 200 trips), but I drive REALLY slow.

I mean, one time I headed out for Thanksgiving, and arrived just in time for Easter...
Sam D.

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 #8 
N. Pass was littered with pieces of shredded tires when I went out. I picked up a bunch but more cleanup is needed. Slow down and be safe. As far as plugging a tire, worth comes to worth you can try shoving towels and sleeping bags inside the punctured tire. Then duct-tape it and drive slowly. I've done it before stopping frequently to add more duct tape.
peneumbra

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 #9 
Good thing you don't use rental cars any more. Your rental insurance is likely VOID if the car is taken offroad - including non-paved roads. 
mdskier

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 #10 
I've had sidewall trouble 3  times when entering with crappy POS rental cars.

Been lucky though only had to call Millers once. Got that one to the paved rt 190 and
it became a standard tow (free) with AAA. That one was the worse. Came in south in a garbage
Daowoo rental car (they don't import that brand anymore! Horray!) Had the worlds worse Kumho street tires with 1 ply sidewalls. Got stuck 1/2 way down the Grapevine in snow as the tire spun becoming unmounted. 2 hours later a truck came by  and pulled me out as I was blocking the road. At the bottom of the Grapevine I decided discretion was the better part of valor, gave up, turned around without visiting the springs.

Defeated I reversed and headed out over South Pass and a second tire punctured a sidewall heading down Lee Flat. Great now 2 tires and a donut spare. Being only 5 miles from pavement I decided to drive very slow (3 mph) to rt 190. The flat totally shredded to only about 1 inch of jagged rubber left but the rim was undamaged when I got a new tire in Reno.  Millers remounted the spun tire so I was good.

Now moved to CA and have BFG K02 off-road tires on a Highlander AWD. These tires never have any problem !
genocache

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Posts: 24
 #11 
I remember a few years back of reading about some guys in the desert and they had a sidewall tear. Took all 30 of their plugs but eventually it held enough air to get out. Now they carry 100 each.

So just because it's bigger than the 1 plug doesn't mean you are doomed.
Glidergeek

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 #12 
Yes I agree but watch a YouTube see how it is supposed to be done then get your hands dirty.
DharmaBum

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 #13 
Youtube is helpful but there is no substitute for getting your hands dirty in this case.
Glidergeek

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 #14 
YouTube
Sparky of SoCal

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 #15 
Buy a kit. Get an ice pick. Late at night go next door and flatten neighbors tire. In the tread section. Next morning offer to be a hero with your tire kit for such emergency. You get the practice, you are a hero. Win,win.
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