Saline Preservation Association

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slash2

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 #1 
A good youtube video explaining the pros and cons of airing down.

Romy

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 #2 
I’ll throw this out there as a general statement for all dirt roads. If you’re going to haul ass on dirt roads, don’t air down. Why? You need the stiffness from higher pressures to keep your sidewalls stiff and avoid rim dents or cracks. Steel rims are a solid plan for reasons stated by knocknock. I say this because I desert race and we tried to get a smoother ride with lower pressure which just resulted in more flats and more time with the sledge beating rims back into shape. 30psi minimum else we’d get flats, and that’s on 10 ply e range tires on a VW bug. That said, if you’re going slow anyhow or carting a heavy load / camper, air down to smooth out your ride and don’t haul ass.
Salt Peter

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 #3 
All good points here.
I do disagree with driving slowly and getting flats. I've had two flats driving in the area. One at a speed greater than 35mph and one in the 5mph range. Flats happen. To date I've had good results using load range E tires with kevlar reinforced sidewalls.
knockknock

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 #4 
I run my steel rims when off road, they dent instead of cracking,and you can hammer rim lips straight
Dana Ohanesian

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 #5 
I agree with Tomd.  Since a veteran off-roader in the 90s told me about airing down, I have never had a puncture flat.  I used to get flats all the time in DV, Panamint and Saline because I was running at full tire pressure, I had Passenger Tires, and my SUV was heavily loaded with gear.  Now, I air down and I invest in LT tires.  Since doing this the only time I have gotten a flat is due to a screw in the tire.  

BTW any off-road video will recommend you air down while on dirt roads.  Like balloons, your tires are much easier to puncture when fully inflated than when somewhat deflated.  




Salt Peter

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 #6 
If you hit a rock at speed with an aired down tire there is less tire to take the impact and the rock can potentially hit the rim. I had something similar happen on a car and a 2x4 on the freeway. Wheel cracked and air loss ensued. Low profile tires are very similar in that there isn't as much absorbing power in the tire itself.
mdskier

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 #7 
I don't see how airing down can cause a cracked wheel.  likely a factory flaw
or you hit something.
tomd

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 #8 
I have been airing down since the mid 70's and it does make a difference both with traction and protecting your tires and rims.

Have done a lot of 4WD off-road driving during those years with only two flat tires while not aired down and none while aired downed. Have done some cosmetic wheel damage from rock hits and scrapes with no structural damage to the wheel itself.

I drive slow and careful when needed and if possible, use a spotter in obvious tight spots.
P3Tacco

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 #9 
I've aired down only a couple of times, as I do not believe it does much (it might, but I am not convinced).  In any case, I wanted to share that I have had a slow leak on one tire now for a while so I took it in to get fixed. It turns out the wheel was actually cracked! Plus there were 2 other huge dents on the inner side of the wheel.  I am thinking that these may have come from those air down times, as I don't have a habit of running over curbs. Just my 2 cents.  2013 F-150, 18" aluminum wheels.
jynxx1970

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 #10 
Remember the wisdom of those who came before us. Turtle Jim always pointed out that nobody ever got a flat tire by driving too slowly.
jynxx1970

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 #11 
That comment will always stick in my head
Romy

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 #12 
Five minutes is overly generous given the rear vehicle will be breathing dust.  I'll give about a minute on dirt.  Then, depending on my schedule, I'll either slow down/pull off for a break or to explore and let a gap form, or I'll get over to the other side of the road and turn my lights/flash brights on so I can be seen in mirrors if the front driver is even mildly paying attention.  I expect people to pull over in this situation, much like on a paved road, it is the courteous/expected way to drive on rural roads.  I'll then pass by slowly to not dust them out.

While I realize that most people that travel to SV/DV don't drive dirt normally, that does not give an excuse to drive like a jerk (for either party).  Albeit if party A is being a dick, there should be no surprise if party B dicks back.

Tires suited to the road go a long way to not getting flats.  A/Ts or M/Ts with the appropriate load rating (or higher) and you should be fine.
Sparky of SoCal

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 #13 

For those poken down the road at whatever pace you personally fill comfortable with in whatever equipped vehicle you may be in that you do not own the road. No more than somebody wishing to proceed at a faster pace in a vehicle much more suited for the type of road travelling. I myself will give you 5 minutes to check your mirror and do something right before I go by. I think 5 minutes on a two lane road is acceptable time.

SilverBob

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 #14 
Remember the wisdom of those who came before us. Turtle Jim always pointed out that nobody ever got a flat tire by driving too slowly.
peneumbra

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Posts: 145
 #15 
What does Farabee charge for renting their jeeps? And if one gets damaged - say, hit by a meteor at the Springs, or something like that - will they pay Miller's to recover it?
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