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PahrumpGeorge

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Posts: 68
 #1 
florida: This is my second Lance; the first caused me no real trouble except for a few loose screws (not including the driver); don't know how many trips it made to Saline but it was many. I really like their layout and features, something happened to cause Lance to loose sight of quality control on some aspects; hopefully this issue has been resolved,

Before I bought this last camper, I looked at several other brands and was appalled at how poorly most were fabricated; this did not include any hidden defects such as I have encountered. My opinion is that the entire RV industry has many needless shortcomings. The bottom line is do your homework and buyer beware. Good luck and let me know how you fair. Geo.
florida

Registered:
Posts: 294
 #2 
I am buying a truck camper soon (not a Lance). I appreciate your post. I gives me something else to look for as I have the camper assembled. In fact, it made me think that I should check how well the water tank in the vanagon is supported. It can't go down, but I wonder what holds it from going sideways on very rough roads?
PahrumpGeorge

Registered:
Posts: 68
 #3 
For those of you with a newer design Lance camper, you may develop a potentially serious series of structural failures as I did. This potential problem is thought to involve only those campers which are the newer light weight design and have the so called basement storage. If you do have a camper of this design, absolutely DO NOT off load, or even raise the camper from the truck bed without first totally empting all 3 holding tanks. If you have had a structural failure, then the tanks could fall from the camper, taking with them the attendant plumbing.

I have a Lance 2006 model 1181; the aluminum tubing support structure for the black water and fresh water tanks failed at each and every connection but one; it survived only because all load had been removed. This tubing structure suspends the tanks from the floor structure above. In my case the grey water tank is supported by a different method and was not a part of the problem.

Now to get to the real problem; in my case the alum. tubing used in the structure is 1in. sq. with the thinnest wall available; not much thicker than foil. While the thin wall tubing was a factor, the real defect was with the welding; not once in approx. 20 welded connections, was a weld properly used. Not only ware all of the welds used in the wrong configuration but they were incomplete, ie, about what one would expect for a tack weld just to hold the frame to gather long enough to complete the final welding. However, the actual weld quality was surprisingly good, albeit too little in the wrong place.

I have experienced other signs of poor quality, including improper use of welds. I recommend that anyone with a similar camper remove the bottom panels and do a through inspection before you develop a more serious problem. I know there have been other similar occurances, but I don't know what years of mfg. or model. Also, I was told by a Lance employee that they have change their tank support design because of this issue.

Hopefully this issue does not affect too many of you; it's a difficult fix, re-welding in place is not an option. If anyone finds that they do have a similar problem, then I will try to help. Rather than clutter this forum with individual issues, you may contact me at gbriz@sbcglobal.net.

George

 
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