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 #16 
You sure that wasn't the famous Panamint Giant Hamster?
Sam D.

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 #17 
I propose utilizing donkey power .

http://www.hertsmemories.org.uk/images/uploaded/scaled/donkey_wheel_s.jpg




rickandurs

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 #18 

Great idea, an ice machine, just one problem, how to power it, it would take a lot more solar panels than Lee currently has, any suggestions?

RpzInc

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 #19 

I vote we bring an ice machine to the springs and let lee use it in return filling up coolers with ice.

BigMc

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 #20 
We have a chest freezer and made our own blocks of ice.  That along with 15 pounds of dry ice, we had ice for quite a while and ended up giving lots away.
Sam D.

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 #21 
priceless advice. Thank you.
I purchased an Igloo 165 qrt cooler for $85 at Costco 2 months ago. It was rated for 7 days. It held the ground for 4 days. Still much better than my previous 5 day cooler which worked for only 2 days. Then the hinges broke. Costco got it back. Now I am back to square one.

As far as warm beer....

Morrie

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 #22 
Just a note regarding the discussion about coolers and ice: there's block ice and there's "block" ice.  Most of the blocks you get at stores delivered to coolers by ice companies are really crushed ice pressed into the shape of a block.  They are only marginally better than ice cubes.  True blocks -- one solid piece of frozen water -- are nearly transparent and, pound-for-pound will last almost twice as long as those crushed blocks.  

I know this because on our last trip we had both kinds of blocks in the same cooler.  After a week with days in the upper 90's, all the crushed blocks were melted but the real blocks were still half there.  

Another benefit: the 10 lb blocks of real ice were far smaller than the 10lb blocks of crushed, so if I had only real blocks I could have fit another couple of them in the cooler.  All things being equal, more lbs of ice means longer-lasting ice.

Alas, it's becoming increasingly hard to find real block ice anymore.  I wish I had a list of them in the DV area.  Most places that make their own ice in a machine have real blocks, but ice delivered from an ice company is usually crushed.  There's an ice machine at Furnace creek near the gas station, but I can't remember what kinds of blocks it has.  Sometimes small out-of-the-way stores have real block ice.

Heck, sometimes you buy a bag of "cubes" and even they aren't real -- more like little chips of ice.  They are near-worthless in a cooler.

I agree with the strategy of having one cooler with nothing but ice.  Never open it except to get ice out for your working cooler.  Ideally I use 3 coolers, the biggest one for ice, a medium one for food which gets open only a couple times a day, and one for drinks which gets open a lot.  I only put a day's worth of drinks in the drink cooler at a time, so as to maximize how much ice I can start out with.  At night I take a day's worth of drinks out from storage and put them down on the ground to give them time to cool off overnight as much as possible, and then refill the drink cooler in the morning.  I never put more ice in the drink cooler, so when its original ice is gone, I move the drinks to the food cooler.  When the food cooler ice has melted down to where there's room for another block, then I'll take one out of the ice cooler.  Eventually there's enough room in the ice cooler for everything -- ice, food and a day's drinks -- so I go down to one cooler.

Actually it's most efficient to have just one giant boat cooler that holds everything -- food, drinks and ice.  I had such a cooler years ago on a houseboat trip on Lake Powell when it was in the high 90's every day, and it easily lasted the week.  But a cooler that big full of ice weighs hundreds of pounds and is far too unwieldy to carry in a vehicle.

Of course, you could save a huge amount of ice by being willing to drink warm beer.  

VegasNaturist

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 #23 
Here's hoping for the best for the gentleman. We recently purchased a SPOT satelite messenger for our trips in the backcountry. We also 4x4 in other areas as well as boat on Lake Mead and Mojave, and figured with the tracking feature and SOS, we'd be easy to find if the worst happened. The unit cost $150 with a $100 annual fee for the service. We also paid an extra $50 for the tracking feature. This transmits our GPS location every 10 minutes. We figured that way, whatever happens, we'd only be no more than 10 minutes from our last known location. http://www.findmespot.com

John
tronaborn

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 #24 
As of yesterday afternoon when I spoke to the investigating ranger, he determined that the vehicle had been recently purchased but not registered by the new owner.  That means there is no way to identify the guy who left the Jeep on the North Pass road.  They could find no record of any Stovepipe Wells employees who failed to show up for work on Monday (as the guy said he needed to do), so about all the ranger can do is conclude that the guy probably got a ride out in the first 24 hours of breaking down and will eventually come back and get his Jeep.  He also siad he asked Lee to keep an eye on the vehicle to see if anything changed or developed.  

Maybe someone going out over the next couple of weeks can report on whether the vehicle is still there or if Lee learns what happened.
SunMan

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 #25 

Please keep us posted if/when you hear back. Lets hope he didn't go for it and was picked up. It seems he was fairly well prepared.

tronaborn

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 #26 
Paul,

I came in last Tuesday and was still at the warm spring when you left.  Had it mostly to myself until leaving today.  Was going to stay another day, but winds came up (forecast said 20-30 with gusts to 45 mph and that's what it felt like).  Big dust clouds towering in the bottom of the valley.  Decided I didn't want to put up with the pounding and left about 2 today.  Temps throughout the week were well above 100, probably above 110.  

Something distressing came up on my way out:

I passed an abandoned vehicle on the way out that belonged to a guy who stopped and talked to me on Sunday afternoon. He'd had a problem with his serpentine belt and was going to risk getting out the north that day.  He made it about 11 miles north of the turnoff to the springs, a long way from nowhere.  His hood was up, his tent was set up and there was even an inflated mattress inside the tent with some personal effects.  Multiple gallons of water were in the back of the Jeep, but no driver.  

The thermometer in the instrument cluster of my truck showed an outside temp of 122 degrees F.  Hopefully he bagged a ride out sometime in the first day or so.  (Someone saw the Jeep yesterday afternoon already abandoned.)  If he made the mistake to try to walk for help, he 's in big trouble.  There's no way anyone can get anywhere that's safe on foot in this weather.  Too far away from the pavement and too far from the warm springs.  Somebody dies out there every year.  

I called the Park Service in Furnace Creek and gave them all the particulars including license number and location.  A ranger that was looking into it called me back to confirm details I gave them.  He's going to keep checking it out.  

I just hope someone picked him up, otherwise we could be reading about it soon here or elsewhere online.  My fingers are crossed.


Sam D.

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 #27 
Priceless advice, Paul. I highly appreciate it.
Sam D.

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 #28 
Hi! Thanks for the report. Could you please elaborate on the fans and the type of cooler you have. Mine was rated for 7 days and had plenty of ice. It all melted in 1,5 days despite my efforts to keep it in shade with wet towels on top. 
Sam D.

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 #29 
I suggest you bring some eucalyptus tree oil spray for the flies. They are vicious - they bite and do not let go even when under water.
M&M

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 #30 
Thanks for the update.

We are going to checkout Lee flats near upper south pass.
Maybe dropping into saline if the weather is too cool above.

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