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Oobleck

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Posts: 40
 #61 
Come alongs are great, BUT, sometimes you need a BIG one to haul a big vehicle, and more importantly, you need something to hook it to. There are few trees in DV, so, while it won't hurt to bring it, it won't replace common sense and four chains.
appletreasures

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Posts: 25
 #62 
I recently bought a "come along".
I understand it is a very handy thing to have.
I have never used it but I am considering taking it along on my next trip to the hot springs. Has anyone ever used one to help with "troubles" along the rough roads?
Please share any uses you have found for this.
Do not limit stories to only road trip rescues.

Shotgun Scott

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Posts: 6
 #63 

Hi-Lows are also useful in the removal of boulders.

Sierra Shadow

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Posts: 37
 #64 
Yeah, I have a High Lift Jack but have never needed it and it takes up a lot of room.  Maybe we will throw it in one more time. 
Rivermountain
 #65 
Has anyone seem my lug wrench that I lent someone near the dunes with a flat twenty years ago - still hoping to get it back

Just kidding - but more seriously, not sure I read anyone mention a high-jack, capable of lifting the vehicle straight up in the front or back and letting it fall over and land outside of the ruts your are stuck in.  
Shotgun Scott

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Posts: 6
 #66 
Chain control between the Kern/Inyo county line to HWY 190 as this is written.  Steady rain in Lone Pine at this time with a temp of 36 deg.
Shotgunscott
Stuck Chuck

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 #67 
Agreed, I have a Cabela's Gortex all weather coverall/jacket outfit for rolling around in the snow, plus neoprene scuba gloves work great for chain instalation.

The outfit was about $200 and it's well made, still using it and keeps me warm. I've had it for about 12 years now.
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 #68 
A waterproof jumpsuit or something similar comes in handy if you have to roll around in the snow putting on tire chains. 
Stuck Chuck

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 #69 

Since I've been a scuba diver, I take either 50 (two), 63 or 80 cubic foot cyclinder with 3000 psi of air, a regulator that has pressure gauge and inflator hose and a plugging kit to fix flats. I remove the second stages. The inflator hose needs the tire inflator component. I have fixed many flats for myself and other motorists.

I prefer BFG all terrains or Michelin XPS tires with steel sidewalls. Stock tires that come with new vehicles are usually cheap tires. Fords come with Firestone and the Jeeps with Goodyear. I've had bad luck with both of those brands.


Chains are mandatory in the winter. Make sure your vehicle is well maintained, tuned up, fluids changed, etc.

The Boy Scout motto "Be Prepared" applies out here. That means bring plenty (several days worth) of water, food, warm clothes in winter, light (white) clothes in summer,
and of course beer or beverages of your choice.

Some sort of sun awning is helpful while camping in spring to fall, make sure it's tied down due to potential winds.

One way to stay cool in the heat of summer is to literally soak your clothes, get them wet, hence light summer clothing.

Sierra Shadow

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Posts: 37
 #70 
Hey thanx!  I will check that out tomorrow.
Oobleck

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Posts: 40
 #71 
Don't buy a new set. Just get some chain and master links and cross chains (available at most auto part stores) and extend the ones you have. I just finished that very job myself.
Sierra Shadow

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Posts: 37
 #72 
I have been going to SV for over 10 years and have always carried chains.  Twice we came back through epic snow conditions and had to chain up.  Now I have 275/70R18 snow/mudders on the my size truck.  The max size for my old chains is 275/65R18.  I tried to get them on in my driveway just now, they won't fit and I mean just barely.  I am tempted to just rely on the large snow tires to get me through but I know this is a bad idea.  So I am off to buy still yet another set of snow chains.  My guess is that they will cost a fortune for the larger size.  
Xtine

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Posts: 5
 #73 
And your wife is very interesting too. On my trips to Saline I carry two spare tires...ask Major Tom what I did to one tire once! I also carry spare fuel in gas cans inside military leatherette water can covers...keeps them  quiet, and maybe a bit safer. I never fill the cans to capacity...about 3.5 or 4 gallons in a 5 gallon can. A new app for my iPhone may be useful sometime...a flashlight app that flashes SOS.
Hope I never need that feature!
Major Tom

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Posts: 353
 #74 
On the other hand, if you don't carry a jack or a spare, you meet interesting people. Just ask my wife!
oregonjohn

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 #75 
I have "tire fix'en" supplies with me at all times in the truck. They consist of a good plug kit, a good patch kit, Slime (the stuff works GREAT, by first hand experience), a GOOD jack and a 12V impact wrench for getting the wheels off. Make sure you know how to use the equipment you bring and be prepared with a good full size spare.
                                                  OJ
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