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Salt Peter

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 #61 
Unregistered I suggest you stop hiding with the "unregistered" moniker. You have fervent opinions yet you hide behind the anonymity. Sign in or shut up.
SilverBob

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 #62 
And be sure to mention your poisoned meat to the Superintendent when you go whine about the camp hosts.  That should be a great way to break the ice!
Hi Desert Warrior

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 #63 
Unregistered- Your a very big Fool for making that remark.  You don't belong in Saline Valley with that attitude. 
Salt Peter

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 #64 
LOL hopefully that "W" thing isn't around as much as the coyotes.
trigger

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 #65 
Hey Salt Peter, to answer your question about the bear spray I'm sure it would although not all dogs respond to it but I think most would. Just make sure I'm upwind of you!
trigger

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 #66 
Hahahaha. No, the Pontiac aztek, as fine of an offroad vehicle as it is is just a smidge to hardcore for me. Ill just stick to my little dodge ram! Lol
Tule

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 #67 
The problem is complicated.  Coyotes learn at a rate comparable to humans.  They also teach teach their young.  What that means is successive generations will know there is food to be had--for easy pickings--at the campsites.  Their main food source is "mousing" and that can be a difficult and uncertain process. Mean while, those coolers in the camp grounds are a sure thing.  So even if we could stop all feeding of the yotes by humans, they will still raid campsites. Their altered diet will eventually lead to desease within the coyote population. 

On a separate note: Hey Trigger: was that you in the mustard colored Pontiac Aztec with the big CB antenna?  If so, I found your hubcap and put it on the side of the road at the entrance to North Pass. 
trigger

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 #68 
The shooting them part was just a joke. Lol! That would have to obviously take place well outside of camp. Shooting in the campground won't fly. Hahahaha
Concerned Citizen
 #69 
Then perhaps someone should remind the camp host to quit feeding the damn things all summer!
James Sel

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 #70 


Seems there are some............

RULES & REGULATIONS
Death Valley National Park
 



Food Storage

• All unattended food, garbage, cooking equipment or similar scented items must be sealed in a vehicle or a solid, non-pliable, animal resistant container.

Animals that feed on human food can become reliant on it and less adapted to the natural conditions of Death Valley National Park. Frequently fed animals can become a nuisance and be aggressive and cause litter to be strewn about campsites and picnic areas.

Hi Desert Warrior

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 #71 
The idea of shooting a coyote in the camping area is very dangerous.  The possibility of a stray bullet going into another camp site could have a grave out come.  Saline Hot Springs is posted no firearms.  I keep my trash and cooler locked in my car over night and haven't had any raider problems.  Coyotes are very smart animals and we are to blame for their boldness by campers feeding them.  Either by direct feeding or leaving coolers and trash bags that are exposed to coyotes where they can be open.  The springs are posted not to feed the animals, it seems that few people heed to the posting.
Salt Peter

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 #72 
What about a shot of bear spray when these raiders are in camp? Just curious, anyone think it would have an effect?
trigger

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 #73 
The coyotes need to be afraid of people. That's all there is to it! This pack mentality is very dangerous to younger kids. They have to be controlled one way or another. We can coexist with them but just like coyotes we are predators and we are no better or worse than coyotes. They are not our pets and our loving companions! They are wild animals. So if "killers" have to come in to maintain balance then so be it. All of us are guilty of encroaching on their territory. Sounds like everyone posting is on the same page as far as not feeding wild animals, which is good. I just came back from a 10 day trip at the springs. The coyotes were in my camp every night gnawing at my coolers, dragging rocks off the cooler tops And tearing bags up. It was annoying no doubt but I understand I'm sharing the area with them and the wild pit bulls. However, they need to be taught not to be so bold. I'm suggesting human sensitivity training hosted by the park service for coyotes. Or a .223 mini 14 will work if that doesn't.
Hi Desert Warrior

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 #74 
No, it was just a comparison between coyotes attacks and domestic ones.  Like Tule correctly pointed out.  K9s in packs of three or more, wild or domestic are very dangerous to humans especially when it comes to food.  At Saline, I have seen a pack of six coyotes at the lower springs. That keep a good distance away from people.  Which makes it hard to get a good picture of them.  I did have two coyotes come into my camp site across from the sunrise pool, one early evening.  One clap of the hand and a yell scared the two coyotes off and I didn't see them again for the rest of that trip.  While camping at the middle springs on many occasions I have seen one coyote, in the day time, checking out the camp sites.  Still it kept its distance and left when I approached to take its picture.
Spank Monkey

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 #75 
I'm a confused.  Are there wild pit bulls in Saline Valley? 
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