Saline Preservation Association

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Salt Peter

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 #16 
Bring a sling shot. That will fend them off and give them something to think about.
I live in a suburban area on the coast and hear coyotes almost every night. They get pretty close and often my neighbors and I hear them make kills. Usually cats and dogs in the neighborhood. Pretty sad when it happens.

In Saline and the wilds just be wise about what you do with your foodstuffs. Keep fending them off and they will realize it isn't worth it. I have had them raid trash in an unburned fire before. Lesson learned.
Hi Desert Warrior

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 #17 
I see no problem with the Saline Coyote.  They have been at the springs before the coming of man.  They are co-existing with the campers and to my knowledge there has been no aggressive attacks.  They look well fed and healthy.  They do come around looking for hand outs and what they can find left out laying around or in unlocked coolers.  Following Park Service guide lines of locking coolers or placing them in your vehicle will prevent them from gaining access to the food.  A simple act of raising your arms, shouting, and briskly walking toward them will chase them off.  They know when and not when to enter a camp when people are around by the actions of the campers.  Which means when everyone is asleep is when they will come around looking for food.  I am sadden to hear when people feed them, its not good for the animal or the camper.  I heard last year a woman not only feed one but she pet it also.  These are not tame animals and if felt threatened will bite.  If that happens then the person bitten will have to under go painful rabies shots.  The same if you pick up a Saline Bat, it will bite.  I read in the papers of coyotes attacking small pets and on two occasions people.  The pictures that are shown of the coyote were under nourished animals, mostly skin and bones.  They are desperate for food and that's why they come into the city because their food is gone do to fires or housing encroachment.  I have no problems with the Saline Coyote.  I enjoy see them and taking pictures and I put my coolers in my car at night before I go to sleep.  I think a lot of people are making a mountain out of a mole hill with the Saline Coyote.  Don't try to hurt them, a wounded animal is a very dangerous animal, any animal, even the Burros.
Glidergeek

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 #18 
Let's see you can't shoot them no guns allowed, and you can't throw metal detectors at them no metal detectors allowed, I guess we should just try and reason with them to go away!
trigger

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 #19 
Hahahahahaha!!!! It was a joke! Killin me! "Talk to the coyotes and let them know how you feel". Oh lord. Lol!!!
Route 66

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 #20 
The coyotes are part of the wildlife of the area.  In other words: "it comes with the territory."  Just as in "bear country," secure and store your food when you are not in camp or at night.  Also, if they come too close, scare them away with loud noises, pots and pans or yes rocks, not to injure but to scare.  As in any wild area, keep a close watch on your small children and pets.  If you still feel insecure, maybe you should stay home.
trigger

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 #21 
Just talk to the coyotes and let them know how you feel. Just like the park service they are very receptive and willing to compromise with us to make positive change. It's as if you guys learned nothing from the government shutdown
paul belanger

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 #22 
I just saw a bit on ABC news that said the same thing.  Throw rocks at them.  Do NOT on any account try to befriend wild coyotes.
FreeFlight107

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 #23 
About the best advice I've ever heard was in Ganistan on what to do about the desert foxes(90% rabies infected!) that came into camp. "Don't Feed them at all costs, do throw rocks at them to get them to avoid humans"

Same goes for yotes anywhere. In my neighborhood in San Diego we've had a pack of 4 attack a group of 3 large dogs before the owners advanced on them.  Word is slowly getting out that the best thing to do is throw something at them when they are seen.
Tule

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 #24 

A pack of coyotes chasing after a puppy broke several panes of glass in the door of a home in a suburb of Chicago Friday as they tried to chase the dog into the house.

"I've never seen anything quite like this," Riverside Police Chief Thomas Weitzel said of the attack on South Herbert Road, Riverside, about a mile from the Des Plaines River.

Dog owner Roger Nelson said it was about 4 a.m. when he let his three dogs -- a beagle, a golden retriever and a German shepherd puppy -- out into the yard.

He said his pups barely made it out of the door when the pack of coyotes came charging.

The coyotes -- Nelson said there were four of them -- came from the bushes and easily cleared a fence.

 "That's about a three-and-a-half foot fence. I mean, they jumped it, no issues at all," he said.

Nelson said he hurried the dogs back inside. They made it, but the coyotes didn't let up.

"[They were] just standing up on their back as they were clawing at the door, and then the two older [dogs] I got, they were snarling back at them and growling," he said.

The coyotes were finally scared away when Nelson fired a high-powered BB gun at them, striking two of them, police said. Nelson's dogs were unharmed.

The attack left a lot of damage to the door. Several panes of glass of an outer door were broken, as was the glass on the main entry door.

Police Sgt. Bill Gutschick said in a statement that in his 25 years on duty, this was the first time he’s heard of coyotes trying to get into a home while chasing a pet.

Riverside has had other recent reports of coyotes attacking pets, Weitzel said, and on Jan. 3, a 7-month-old Bichon-Poo puppy was killed in the 100 block of Addison Road.

Weitzel urged residents to be aware of wild animals in the area.

"Coyotes do not know the difference between pets and the wild creatures they hunt, so try to protect pets by accompanying them outdoors," he said.

And use a short leash, he said.

paul belanger

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 #25 
Lys

Yes, the dingo did get the kid.....but the Aussie govt figured her for the culprit and put her in prison for years before the truth came out.

Tule

Again, thanks for the good response.  I have thoroughly schooled my kids on the dangers of the coyotes at Saline, but I still worry about it.  Thank you for your concern.  You are also acknowledging what I have always thought was common sense, that we are on the totally wrong track with these indigenous animals.  Intentionally, or unintentionally, feeding them goes against the cycle of life in the desert.  There is a sense of tranquility at Saline that could cause some of us to become complacent.  Let's not let that happen.

Some might insinuate that this type of thing is justification for removal of humans from the valley.  I would counter that as smart as coyotes are, we should be smarter.  We should educate our fellow travelers in the desert.  Even the camp hosts.
Tule

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 #26 
Paul

The coyote has long recognized by scientists as a highly intelligent and keenly intuitive line of canines.  Beyond the science, there's the recognition by many present day and aboriginal cultures (including those indigenous to SV) of the coyote's exceptional survival skills.  Most Great Basin cultures revered the yote for it's ability to out wit humans time and again (as I do). And in some of aboriginal cultures, the coyote is regarded as a spiritual medium.  I once heard a lecturer state when the apocalypse comes, the only two surviving species will be the cockroach and the coyote.  I don't interpret the dog lying down where it was shown in the photo as a threat per se.  To me it demonstrates the animal has (and probably rightly so) learned there is no credible threat to come from humans at the springs. Hence, the coyotes will be further emboldened.  This is not a good thing for yote or humans.  You mentioned your kids.  Most children (and some adults) won't recognize a yote as wild and potentially dangerous animal.  I hope you school them well on this topic.  I'm not the boy who cried wolf.  I'm simply saying we are on the wrong track.

Lysdexic

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 #27 
Actually, the dingo really did eat their baby.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Azaria_Chamberlain
paul belanger

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 #28 
Can one imagine the ton of bricks coming down if a small child was involved in an incident with a coyote?  Like the when the Aussie couple claimed a dingo dragged their kid away.

Lysdexic

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 #29 
I mentioned to several people there that coaxing coyotes close with food might not be such a good idea for that very reason, Paul - I want wild animals wary of humans in all sizes.

I'm starting to think that slingshots are a pretty good idea after all.


paul belanger

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 #30 
Tule

Why do you say that about the coyote?  To what extent might you speculate that their behavior is becoming modified by interaction with humans at the springs? 

The reason I am so interested in this issue is I bring my young children with me to the springs.  They are bigger now, 7 & 9 years old, maybe more intimidating a size for a 'yote to grab, but still.  The idea of my kids being attacked by coyotes freaks me out.
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