Saline Preservation Association

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D.A. Wright

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Posts: 11
 #1 
Good question and I don’t have an answer myself.

After owning/operating my site for over a decade, I burned out and took it offline around 2010. The web host pestered me to put it back up, so I compromised and gave him the site; after removing a lot of content that dealt with my travels, historical stories, and odds & ends like my photos of automotve test mules.

The new owner, whose site hosted mine (4WDTrips.net), kept it as is untill a year or so ago, then dropped it suddenly. Then just as sudden reinstated it until a couple months ago when I noticed it gone. I also noted that the 4WDTrips site has also changed hands.

So will it come back? I haven’t a clue.

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D.A. Wright
TopoDcat

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Posts: 6
 #2 
@ D.A. Wright  always enjoyed your route descriptions on the Reconnoitering site. can not find them anymore. is there a new host site? or new address?

D.A. Wright

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Posts: 11
 #3 
Already stated, but single ply sidewall tires are more vulnerable to sidewall rips and punctures when aired down. Even LT rated. P rated tires, no way, don’t air down, you are at risk already. 3-ply sidewall tires, fine.

I run a 2002 Tacoma TRD 4x4. Always ran BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A 10-ply tires, until my current set of 10 ply LT rated Cooper tires but single ply sidewalls (getting old, don’t off road as much except during hunting season). My practice was to air down from 35psi street to generally 18-20 psi dirt. Never a flat. Did carry a big bottle of Slime and a plug kit and a package of extra plugs, but never needed them.

I’ve run all the trails in and around Saline over the decades I lived in Big Pine and June Lake.

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D.A. Wright
bobhuckaby

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Posts: 143
 #4 
I carry a Slime kit of goo and air compressor got at WalMart, used it to fix someone else's flat on north pass,
and to pump up a slow leak a couple times enough to get home in my truck
still ride the low pressure into Big Pine for Shell station to refill normally
bob from tahoe
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #5 
Many moons ago a buddy and I took his folks 1962 GMC pickup into Saline, bald tires, no spare, leaking fluids,etc. We made it to the midpoint down south pass into the valley but turned back due to thick fog. Decided to go into the park via Hunter and Tea Kettle Junction. That’s where we got our flat! The only thing in our armamentarium was a bottle of flat-fix and a foot pump. After more than an hour jumping up and down we were back on our way! We dodged a bullet...
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #6 
Thanks for the input! I still plan to carry a pump even though I’m riding on some Yokohama Geolanders; I might need to repair a flat or even air down for a sandy wash. Eventually, I plan a full upgrade of the wheels and rubber.
Sparky of SoCal

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Posts: 87
 #7 
I remember that spark plug pump was the first thing my old man bought from JC Whitney after someone gave him a catalog about '64. I still have it somewhere.
James Sel

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Posts: 365
 #8 
Once upon a time 56102.jpg 
SilverBob

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Posts: 384
 #9 
Tomonoar, if your Subaru uses standard "P" Metric passenger car tires, I don't recommend airing down at all.  Most passenger car manufacturers size the tires to match the weight of the vehicle they're fitted to when fully inflated.  This is done purely for ride comfort and fuel mileage on the pavement.  If you've upgraded your tires, then we can start to talk about dropping air pressure to improve the off-road ride.

As an example, the stock tires on my Land Cruiser are rated to carry 3306 lbs. per tire.  Two of them could comfortably carry the rig when loaded to its max weight (6250 lbs).  Since it has 4 of them, that leaves me a lot of room to play with pressure to improve the ride.  Passenger car tires simply do not have that much "safety  margin" in most cases.  
Sparky of SoCal

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Posts: 87
 #10 
http://www.viaircorp.com/portables/400p-auto/
This what I use for 35" tires. Not as fast as a bottle but I never have to prepare ahead of time. They have larger and smaller units. They are not Pep Boy like toys. This are quality and rebuildable if ever needed.
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #11 
Interesting idea! I’m in an Outback with standard tires so I think a decent 12 volt pump should suffice, but having a backup tank of compressed gas is a good idea.
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #12 
Reviving an old-ish thread! Looking for recommendations for a portable compressor for airing back up for the tarmac. Considering a Vaire.
chrishaynesusa

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Posts: 15
 #13 
I run an Xterra setup for rock crawling and camping.
GVW of 6320 lbs with gear and I run 16 PSI on Goodyear MT's with kevlar sidewalls
works great all day long.
encore889

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Posts: 38
 #14 
Exactly greyscreek... i dont get how trucks and suvs got so damn heavy and so huge...i used to hv a lil Mitsubishi mighty max 2wd and i would go anywhere and everywhere and over anything in that lil rig. And get good mileage to boot... now all i see is ginormous 2 ton trucks w campers on top... worrying about getting around boulders.... lo
l

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Just say no to shirtcocking, or donald ducking! [biggrin]
GreysCreek

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Posts: 6
 #15 
Back in the early 60's we used to drive our little Datsun station wagon into Saline. Would run tires over the ruts. We brought several large trucks to our ranch(not 4x4's, but just my Dad's big old paint trucks to haul stuff in and out. The roads were pretty rough at times and impassable once in a while, but usually we made it through okay. Always loved looking for the burro ears amongst the rocks.
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