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Wombat

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Posts: 38
 #1 

Running 32” Muds (Currently Firestone Destinations), I use Staun Deflaters to 17 psi.

I carry a cheap pump to inflate them later, Master Flow MF-1050.

 

Salt Peter

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 #2 
Sadie this thread is about airing down. There is a video posted in that regard. Please check the other road condition threads for specific route conditions.
sadie0528

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 #3 
can't see the pic..😔😊 how did you enter and exit the springs..??
slash2

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Posts: 50
 #4 
dautremont

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Posts: 45
 #5 
Reducing air pressure for rough roads has several effects:  Increased traction due to larger contact area or contact patch of the tire on the ground, less ground clearance,   reduced PSI load of the tire on the ground, since the contact area is larger, to spread the truck weight over a larger contact area, softening the ride on a rough road by using the flexibility of the sidewall to enhance the effect of the shocks and springs.  The reduction in punctures is generally due to the larger tire area over which the truck weight is spread over.  Since the truck weight is spread over a larger tire ground contact area, lower truck weight per square inch of tire contacting the ground = fewer punctures.  There are risks: the tire can come off the rim if the pressure is too low;  the tire can overheat if the speed is too high and/or the ambient temp is high, like in the summer;  poorer handling of the vehicle compared to normal tire inflation.  Generally tire pressures of 15-20 psi are acceptable for off road, lower if one uses beadlock rims.  The lower the pressure the slower you must travel to avoid tire damage, from the metal rim crushing the tire sidewall during tire flex, or overheating.  Low profile sidewall tires are particularly at risk on rough roads, since lowered air pressure creates more potential for sidewall damage if going too fast.  
Summary :  use LT tires, like 75% aspect ratio or higher,  air down to 15-20 psi, slow down to avoid tire damage and poor handling, and enjoy a better ride quality with far fewer tire punctures.    
bobhuckaby

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Posts: 169
 #6 
Interesting to review what I have learned since opening this topic 5 years ago.
Airing down to 25 takes out 70% of the washboard rattle, compared to 65-75 highway pressure for heavy truck.
Before I started airing down had 2 tread punctures in M55's which were supposed to be bullet proof, none since I am airing down - knock on wood.
Airing down clearly exposes the side walls, AT tires with 10-ply load E sidewalls show visible scrapes but stand up to rocks at moderate speeds, still want to avoid the sharp rocks anywhere.
bob from tahoe
Sam D.

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 #7 
Airing down is for smoother washboard experience and reduction of main thread punctures. Airing down increases the chances of sidewall punctures  especially on tires that do not have sidewall protection. I've also seen tires coming off their wheels when deflated too much. 
sierragrl

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Posts: 11
 #8 
OK, I'm confused.  I always thought the purpose of airing down was to decrease the odds of sidewall punctures.  As I read these comments, it appears that airing down is mostly for the purpose of making the washboard road ride less jarring and actually INCREASES the odds of sidewall punctures.

Can someone clarify for me?  What is the effective purpose of airing down? 

FYI - I drive a stock 4wd Tacoma, no camper, just a shell, with newer BFG AT tires, My main concern is avoiding flats.


Thanks
Ogiebendogie

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Posts: 1
 #9 
Airing down will help keep things (like your teeth) from shaking loose.

I use:

https://www.amazon.com/ARB-ARB505-E-Z-Deflator-Orange/dp/B004LQCDOA/ref=sr_1_10?keywords=tire+air+down&qid=1578508935&sr=8-10

for airing down

and:
https://www.amazon.com/Viair-00088-88P-Portable-Compressor/dp/B005ASY23I/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=viair+88p&qid=1578508258&sr=8-2

for airing up.
D.A. Wright

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Posts: 18
 #10 
Good question and I don’t have an answer myself.

After owning/operating my site for over a decade, I burned out and took it offline around 2010. The web host pestered me to put it back up, so I compromised and gave him the site; after removing a lot of content that dealt with my travels, historical stories, and odds & ends like my photos of automotve test mules.

The new owner, whose site hosted mine (4WDTrips.net), kept it as is untill a year or so ago, then dropped it suddenly. Then just as sudden reinstated it until a couple months ago when I noticed it gone. I also noted that the 4WDTrips site has also changed hands.

So will it come back? I haven’t a clue.

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D.A. Wright
TopoDcat

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Posts: 6
 #11 
@ D.A. Wright  always enjoyed your route descriptions on the Reconnoitering site. can not find them anymore. is there a new host site? or new address?

D.A. Wright

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Posts: 18
 #12 
Already stated, but single ply sidewall tires are more vulnerable to sidewall rips and punctures when aired down. Even LT rated. P rated tires, no way, don’t air down, you are at risk already. 3-ply sidewall tires, fine.

I run a 2002 Tacoma TRD 4x4. Always ran BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A 10-ply tires, until my current set of 10 ply LT rated Cooper tires but single ply sidewalls (getting old, don’t off road as much except during hunting season). My practice was to air down from 35psi street to generally 18-20 psi dirt. Never a flat. Did carry a big bottle of Slime and a plug kit and a package of extra plugs, but never needed them.

I’ve run all the trails in and around Saline over the decades I lived in Big Pine and June Lake.

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D.A. Wright
bobhuckaby

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Posts: 169
 #13 
I carry a Slime kit of goo and air compressor got at WalMart, used it to fix someone else's flat on north pass,
and to pump up a slow leak a couple times enough to get home in my truck
still ride the low pressure into Big Pine for Shell station to refill normally
bob from tahoe
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #14 
Many moons ago a buddy and I took his folks 1962 GMC pickup into Saline, bald tires, no spare, leaking fluids,etc. We made it to the midpoint down south pass into the valley but turned back due to thick fog. Decided to go into the park via Hunter and Tea Kettle Junction. That’s where we got our flat! The only thing in our armamentarium was a bottle of flat-fix and a foot pump. After more than an hour jumping up and down we were back on our way! We dodged a bullet...
Tomonoar

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Posts: 8
 #15 
Thanks for the input! I still plan to carry a pump even though I’m riding on some Yokohama Geolanders; I might need to repair a flat or even air down for a sandy wash. Eventually, I plan a full upgrade of the wheels and rubber.
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