Saline Preservation Association

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Wombat

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 #1 

OK then well let’s make it 146.550 in honor of you! [smile]

Might I suggest a separate post here on this forum, “Saline Valley Communication” or somehting and in that put the common Simplex frequency and CB Channel [though CB suuuuc….OK I won’t say it].  As you are a more senior member here than am I, I request you make that post as it might carry more weight.  The separate post will give it a bit more visibility.

We can start using it and posting it ‘other places’ as well. 

I often turn off the radio upon arrival as I am normally using the mobile on the ride in.  When folks in my group split up in the day we normally have them on just in case.  But, I shall start carrying an HT (with biger antenna) about on 146.550 and encourage folks I am with to do the same.

We could put a sign in the bathrooms also?

Other ideas?

SilverBob

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 #2 
OK, pick one and we'll start recommending it.  I like 146.550 for the reason I mentioned above, but I'm open to any of them. 

Just be advised that I've never seen more than a couple hams in the valley at any given time, and most of us shut the radios off when we get to the springs.  Also, the majority of springs visitors aren't even aware of this website, so it might take a while to catch on.
Wombat

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 #3 

I do not know why they picked 147.770. I rechecked my programming files I have kept for years and this is for sure it. From Ballarat one can Simplex with  Ridgcrest on a good day. I have done it. There used to be folks up at the mine who monitored it as well. Not sure they do anymore but half of the time you can get someone. The south end of Panamint  Valley you can get Trona’s repeater and I have occasionally gotten folks on it.

One does not need to meet up on the National Calling Frequency and then go   someplace else. One can just start someplace else. I am almost never on the national calling frequencies so as to leave them to others who need them.  I do listen sometimes on the road alone but often I just scan. I have banks in my mobile and set them up one per area. I pick the ban for the area I am in and the just scan the bank.

The whole So. Cal. band plan is here for 2-meter: http://www.tasma.org/bandplan.pdf  I would suggest something like 146.535 or 146.550. If we all pick one and promote that as the Saline Frequency, folks coming into the valley can ask for info and all that, alert of trouble . . .borrow a cup of sugar . . . .  be social . . . ask for help . .  Folks up in the Inyos could day hello . . .It would be fun!

Desert season is soon !  Others might like to chime in.

SilverBob

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 #4 
Nice post, Wombat.  Lots of useful information there!

I wonder why 147.770 is used as a simplex frequency.  According to accepted ARRL band plans for the US, that should be the input frequency for a 147.170 repeater, and I can't even find anywhere that would allow a repeater on the frequency.  It should be on either .160 or .180.  It probably doesn't make any difference as long as you stay in the valley, but you could cause unwanted interference  if you use it from the mountain tops.

As for a Saline frequency, I don't know.  Proper etiquette would suggest that you make contact on the call frequency (146.520), then move to another nearby frequency to carry on your conversations. 

The recognized simplex frequencies in California are as follows:

145.510,  145.525, 145.540, 145.555, 145.570, 145.585, 145.600, 145.615, 145.630 (Amateur TV Voice), 146.445,  146.460 (Remote bases), 146.520 (call freq.), 146.535, 146.550, 146.580, 146.595, and 147.510.


Aside from the three with special purposes, you can pick any one you want. I usually use 146.550 because we used it a lot at Burning Man and I've got it programmed in all my radios.  [thumb]
Wombat

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 #5 

Reviving and old thread . . . because you cannot stop me, hahahahaha . . .

HTs (Handi Talkie)  and Mazourka  from the Springs:

If you really want a clear shot with low watts, the antenna is indeed everything. I have a home made yagi antenna made of pvc and wire. I have backpacked with it as it dismantles into just a couple of poles.  I can connect it to my main HT (FT-250) and hit Mazourka  from the Springs clearly with just 5 watts. Some days, when the weather is just making is harder, you have to be a little careful where you stand to get in to the repeater.

Saline Valley Frequency:

146.520 is the 2 meter National Calling Frequency. It is not for general comms or rag chewing.  It would be a great idea to have a common simplex frequency for everyone in the valley to communicate. I believe in Panamint Valley it is 147.770 MHz . . .  it might be up to this bunch to pick one for Saline?

For Emergency use:

As presented above, 146.520 is the 2 meter National Calling Frequency. It should be monitored by many. I scan this frequency when scanning (which I am not always doing).  It is one’s best chance of getting a random listener on Simplex but do not count on it.  Often just scanning is better.
 446.000 and 223.500 are also National Calling Frequencies if you have radios that support the 70cm and/or 1.25 meter bands.

There is a “Wilderness Protocol” that says one should monitor/transmit emergency traffic at 0100, 0400, 0700, 1000, 1300, 1600, 1900 and 2200 for five minutes.
To draw attention to your transmission, use LiTZ (Long Tone Zero) by pressing “0” on the keypad for ten seconds and then make your call.

If you can, get up high because it will help you get your signal out. From New York Butte in the Inyos (over 10,000 ft) over looking Saline Valley, I was able to get on the Big Bear Repeater and talk without issue.  I could talk to LA, OC and more via that repeater and it is 178 miles from that spot.  Higher is better!

Consider getting more than your Technician License.  A General is not hard to get, and you can get on HF (and then get your Extra to get all of HF). HF travels much farther.  You can string up an antenna made of wire and talk 100s or 1000s or miles depending on the band or the time of day.

More on Getting Started:

Some people jump in and buy a Kenwood, or Yeasu or other mobile rig and there is nothing wrong with that. My FT-7900 is a great radio and I love it!  But you can get in the door for a lot less money now and  I know folks who do this . . .

For general trail use and fun the Baofeng  UV-5R is about 30 bucks, gets you both 2 meter and 70 cm at 4 watts (plenty of the trail): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008IYCQSO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

If you couple that with a dual band fold over Diamond or Comet Antenna (like a SBB5 with a HD-5M mount – see http://www.hamradio.com/ and search) and you’ll be set! 

It you do not want to spend money on an antenna and mount, get the17 buck Tram Mag Mount: http://www.amazon.com/Tram-1185-Amateur-Dual-Band-Antenna/dp/B0045EQUBK/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1407275714&sr=1-1&keywords=tram+1185 . For either antenna set up, get an SMA Female to SO-239 adapter: http://www.amazon.com/DHT-Handheld-Antenna-Baofeng-Quasheng/dp/B00COKNKS8/ref=pd_sim_e_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=0YTB15DW2FZ4PFWZ8A13 

Toss in a Speaker Microphone for 7 bucks: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008RZ0EQ0/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

A battery eliminator so you can plug it in a cigarette lighter: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B3PWAX6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

Because you’ll likely hike with the radio also, get a better antenna for that, 17 bucks: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00L4PU8KM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

These radios can be programmed using your PC! All you need is a cable: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008RZJHJU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and a free program called Chirp http://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home.  Then, make an image, edit and send it back to the radio: http://www.miklor.com/COM/UV_CHIRP.php

The radio programmed is way, way easier to use!!!!

I have a couple of UV-5R and they are great for the price.

That seems like a lot but it is just a few clicks on Amazon . . . and CB will seem like a bad dream for a bit until you forget it.

Baofeng is also in the process of changing its name to Pofung. They make a radio in the new format called the UV-82: http://www.amazon.com/Pofung-UV-82-Black-Two-Way-Radio/dp/B00E4KLY34/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1407277726 which has few advantages over the UV-5 series, the same 2 meter/70 cm  dual band set up. It uses the same USB programming cable and many other parts but has an odd set up with two push to talk buttons.  Anyway, I mention it here because there is a UV-82x version http://www.amazon.com/BaoFeng-UV-82X-Warranty-Dual-Band-Transceiver/dp/B00GFAJPC8/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1407278068 that is 2 meter/ 1.25 meter (220) that is the cheapest way to get on the nearly empty 1.25 meter band.  It you get that same Tram mag mount and cut the antenna to so that the base and antenna together are about 12.6 inches,  you will have a mobile 220 rig.  I also have one of these at it works great.

There, this thread has a ton of info to get folks started!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Desert Warrior

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Posts: 209
 #6 
It has been suggested that 146.520 simplex and channel 20 on CB for Saline Valley.  For those running 20 watts or better mobile on 2 meters then Mazourka Peak repeater is best.  Its a duplex repeater, transmit on 146.1600 and receive on 146.7600.  Coming in on the south route the signal is picked up as your going down grapevine and remains strong all the way to palm springs.  Coming in from Big Pine the signal is strong until you get to the base of the Inyo Mountains near Willow Creek (the wash out section).  It becomes a little weak with background static until your past Willow Creak.  It gets strong again all the way to palm springs.
stan

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 #7 
What frequency is suggested for use in the valley, assuming I can't hit the Mazourka Peak machine?  146.520 MHz possibly???  stan
Tule

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 #8 
That's impressive considering it's 22 air miles and there is 1K ridge (looks like it on Google Earth) blocking LOS from the springs.
SilverBob

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 #9 
I was unable to get into Mazourka Peak with my little 4-watt BaoFeng using the stock antenna.  There was another ham in the valley who was able to reach it with a 1/4 wave mag-mount antenna on his truck, hooked to the same radio I had.  Of course, it's no problem with my mobile, even on 5 watts.  The antenna is the key.
Tule

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 #10 
Are you guys able to ping Mazourka from the valley on a hand-held?  I'm talking an FT 60R.
craig333

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 #11 
From the Saline Valley I was able to communicate quite well into the Owens Valley using the Mazourka Peak repeater. 
zidaro

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 #12 
Great information here, thankyou all for the info and links.  Esp. SilverBob and Wombat [biggrin]
Wombat

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Posts: 38
 #13 

I remember CB licenses, and when folks had actual Handles and all that. I had a friend when we were kids put up a little tower and an antenna so he could babble with truckers on the Interstate. Damn, boredom!

winks

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 #14 
When I started with CB it still had to be licensed. I got my call sign from the Feds, but if I recall, I was one of the last to get it and never had to use it. KBPU3301. That number sticks in my head, but by the time my rig was up and running, tuned and awesome, no one cared what my call sign was. Somewhat disappointing.
Wombat

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Posts: 38
 #15 

I think for off road it is going to slowly replace CB, more so in the more remote areas.  VHF/UHF FM sound so much better to the ear and go so much farther!  

Plus it is useful on the way to places. Folks do not need to ball up so much in traffic and follow in a line.  A caravan can be stretched out for miles and mile, and even just not leave together at all, yet still talk.

I have found it useful afoot as well. From high spots  one can get out very far.  From Telescope Peak I have gotten on to K6BB (Big Bear Repeater with coverage all over the LA Basin and down into OC) and was able to talk to my wife from up there using a 5 watt Hand Held.  I have had similar success from many high spots.

Later you can upgrade to General and then Extra, get on HF and babble across the county. If not the world.

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